Attorney General DeWine Releases Age-Progression Photograph in 1985 Missing Person Case



(ZANESVILLE, Ohio)— Ohio Attorney General Mike DeWine today released an age-progression photograph of a woman who disappeared in 1985.

Barbara Frame was last seen on January 30, 1985, when she left her home with plans to return to cook dinner. Her car was found abandoned the next day on Linden Avenue in Zanesville. She was last seen wearing long pants, a coat, and tennis shoes. 

A forensic artist with the Ohio Attorney General’s Bureau of Criminal Investigation (BCI) created the image to draw more attention to the case in an effort to generate new leads on her whereabouts or disappearance.

“It has been more than thirty years since Barbara Frame was last seen, but she hasn’t been forgotten,” said Attorney General DeWine. “We encourage anyone with information on what happened to her to come forward.”

Frame was 38 years old when she disappeared and would be 71 years old today. She has green eyes and is between 5’5″ and 5’8″ tall.  She had brown hair and weighed between 125 and 140 pounds at the time of her disappearance.  

A public bulletin on the case issued by BCI’s Criminal Intelligence Unit today can be found here.

Anyone with information should contact the Zanesville Police Department at 740-455-0700 or Ohio Bureau of Criminal Investigation at 740-845-2406. 

This is the second age-progression photograph created by BCI’s forensic artist. An image of a woman missing from Parma since 1990 was released in November. 

The BCI Missing Persons Unit was created to assist local law enforcement in missing persons cases. There are currently more than 1,000 people listed as missing in the Attorney General’s Missing Persons Database

In addition to age-progression photographs, BCI’s forensic artist is available to assist local law enforcement with the creation of forensic facial reconstruction models and post-mortem images to help identify unidentified remains. 

Missing Persons Unit analysts can also provide case review, investigative assistance, link charts, and mapping.

BCI also offers the Ohio LINK (Linking Individuals Not Known) Program, a free service to police, coroners, and families of missing individuals. The LINK Program was established through the Attorney General’s Office in 1999 to help match DNA taken from family members of missing individuals to DNA from unidentified remains.  Samples of DNA submitted by family members as part of the LINK Program are compared only to DNA samples of unidentified remains submitted through similar programs nationwide. 

Law enforcement officials or family members of missing persons interested in learning more about the services BCI’s Missing Persons Unit provides should call 855-BCI-OHIO (855-224-6446).

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